Siai-Marchetti S.211

Date Updated:
Thursday March 23, 2006


 


Technical Details |Service History | Current Status |Photos | Fleet
Information
| Write-Offs


Technical Details

Tandem seat jet
trainer and light strike aircraft.  Powered by a Pratt & Whitney of Canada
JT15d-4C Turbofan that puts out 2,500lb of static thrust.  Equipped with
two Martin Baker Mk10 zero-zero ejection seats.  No armament is normally
fitted.  PAF aircraft can be equipped with four hardpoints with the inner
hardpoints capable of taking up to 330kg of ordnance each.  The outer
hardpoints can take up to 165kg of ordnance.  PAF aircraft have been seen
carrying two 270 liter auxiliary tanks to give increased range – something which
they have made extensive use of over the Spratly islands.  Can also be
armed with a .50 cal center line machine gun in a pod below the cockpit.

The fleet has traditionally been
split between two organizations in the PAF – the
5th
Fighter Wing
at Basa
and the

100th Training Wing
at Fernando and Rajah Buayan.  Aircraft operated by
the former were usually dressed in camouflage colors while 100th TW aircraft
were usually be found in day-glo orange and silver combinations.  Both
colors have been giving way to a light gray color scheme with a checkerboard
strip on the top of the tail as the aircraft went through overhauls. 

Also in service with Singapore,
where incidentally it has a better safety record.

Service
History

First aircraft delivered in 1988. 
Was originally to have numbered 36 aircraft but orders were cut short after a
spate of much publicized accidents.  Only about 7 aircraft out of
16 remaining are flyable (25 delivered).  A number remain in open storage as either
parts sources or are awaiting funding for overhaul or parts like so many other PAF aircraft.  Three underwent overhauls in 2001 in the Philippines. 
9 lost in accidents, though some must have been rebuilt.  The type has suffered more than most PAF aircraft
from under funding and bad press.

Possibly the most unpopular aircraft in the
Philippine press, though this is an unfair reputation.  Initially used as an advanced trainer by the 100th
Training Wing, the type is now also shared with the 5th Fighter Wings Combat
Crew Training squadron and the 7th TFS primarily to undertake jet conversion,
strike training and reconnaissance missions .  Recently, it has been used
to carry out visual reconnaissance missions over the Spratly Islands and over
Mischief Reef  (while carrying two 270liter wing tanks to extend its range)
. These missions were carried out at such a low level and with such frequency
that the Chinese issued a diplomatic protest. 

The PAF
has limited the S211s participation in COIN missions, preferring instead to use
OV-10s or SF260s which are more appropriate due to their lower speed and longer
loiter times.  It is also a reflection on how important the type is to the PAF –
establishing and maintaining a training stream of pilots is a pre-requisite for
maintaining a viable combat force. 

At least two however are always fitted out with hardpoints and
carry the 12.7mm gun pod in the centerline.  A few have been fitted with
drop tanks (2 x 270 liters) and have been sent on low level reconnaissance
missions over Mischief Reef.  The flights were at such a low level that the
Chinese filed a protest with the Philippine government. 

There is nothing inherently wrong with
the type.  The problem lies in the PAF practice of under funding
maintenance – of acquiring more units than it can adequately support at current
financing levels.

Current
Status

PAF S.211s have enjoyed relatively
high availability rates in the past, though this number has now gone down
considerably.  Mostly this is due to the fact that the PAF wants to
maintain a constant training stream of pilots to combat units and also to
maintain the proficiency of it fast jet pilots.  The PAF seems to have
found a partial solution to its maintenance problems with regard to the S.211 at
least – a number of units have gone through overhauls with
Aerotech Industry
Philippines
.  This may account for the discrepancy in S.211 numbers since
there are obviously more aircraft available than delivered – either new one’s
were delivered as attrition replacements or, most likely, airframes that had
previously been written off were rebuilt and brought back into service. 

 

inventory

supportable

operationally ready

 

 

 

 

1991 (CY-91)

14

10

  8

1992 (CY-92)

18

14

10

1993 (CY-93)

18

11

  6

1994 (1st semester CY-94)

20

13

  7

2002 (CY-00, November) 19

6

 1
2003 (Speculative) 19

?

  7 (?)
2004 (Speculative) 19

7?

  7 (?)

 Fleet
Information


PAF s/n

PAF code

c/n

last
noted / fate

notes

 

 

 

 

 

A
first batch of 18 aircraft was ordered in 1988, with an option on a further
18. The first Italian-

built
machine was delivered in 09.89; the first Philippine-assembled example was
07007, which first flew 22.01.91. Original distribution plans were for nine
aircraft to serve at Fernando AB and nine at both Basa AB and Mactan AB.

07001

801

07 / 001

03.95,
01.99, 03.03

5 FW.
Overhauled with the assistance of Aerotech Philippines.  First flight
after overhaul March 2003.

07002

802

07 / 002

05.98

5 FW

07003

803

07 / 003

01.97,
01.99

5 FW

07004

804

07 / 004

01.97,
05.98, 05.06

5 FW;
reported as „sold to Panama AF early 1996“ (obviously not true). Overhauled
with the assistance of Aerotech Philippines.

07005

805

07 / 005

03.95,
06.96, 01.99

Red Aces

07006

806

07 / 006

w/o
11.03.92

100 TW

07007

007

07 / 007

01.97,
01.99

5 FW

07008

008

07 / 008

01.96,
06.96, 01.99

5 FW

07009

809

07 / 009

w/o
14.12.98

5 FW

07010

810

07 / 010

w/o
20.04.92

100 TW.

07011

011

07 / 011

06.96,
01.99

5 FW

07012

012

07 / 012

06.96,
01.97, 01.99

5 FW

07013

813

07 / 013

???

re-serialled
07019 (aircraft may have  been rebuilt following an accident or  just have
been given a new serial out of superstition – can anyone confirm the
reason?) and w/o as  such 11.03.93

07014

814

07 / 014

03.95,
06.96, 01.99

5 FW

07015

815

07 / 015

06.96,
05.98, 01.99

100 TW/105
TS

07016

816

07 / 016

03.95,
06.96, 05.98

5 FW

07017

017

07 / 017

w/o
14.01.02

5 FW

07018

018

07 / 013

w/o
21.09.92

wreck
noted dumped Basa AB 01.97,   05.98, 01.99

07019

819

07 / 019

w/o
11.03.93

100 TW

 

 

 

 

 

A
second batch of six aircraft was ordered in 1992.

09001

020

09 / 001

01.97,
03.00

5 FW

09002

021

09 / 002

03.95,
01.99

5 FW

09003

022

09 / 003

03.95,
01.99, 02.06

Red Aces. 
Displayed with 4 hardpoints at the Philippine International Balloon
Festival, feb 2006. Time exprired.  Waiting for overhaul.

09004

023

09 / 004

01.97,
01.99

Red Aces

09005

024

09 / 005

10.94,
01.99

Red Aces

09006

025

09 / 006

damaged
04.07.95,

but
active again 01.99

5 FW


Write-offs
 

date

s/n

fate
of crew


location, remarks

 

 

 

 


11.03.92  

07006

Both crew
killed.

Stalled
after engine fire and crashed on approach to Fernando AB. Accident was
blamed on human error.


20.04.92   

07010

Pilot Lt.
Jaime Sampang and backseater Lt. Roberto Espanola killed.

Dived
into the ground from 10,000ft at what PAF officials described as „unusually
high speed, after radio contact was lost and the aircraft was seen to be
flown erratically“ while rehearsing for the funeral of the pilot‘s
girlfriend, Lt. Rosela Junio, who had been killed in the crash of an
MD.520MG two days earlier. It is suspected that Lt. Sampang committed
suicide.


21.09.92  

07018

 

Crashed
on take-off from Bautista AB.


11.03.93   

07019

Pilot
instructor and female student ejected safely.

Exploded
in mid-air 30 minutes into a training flight from Fernando AB and crashed in
Batangas province. Investigation into the cause of the accident found poor
maintenance was to blame as a poorly installed ejection seat slid out of
place while the aircraft was flying inverted, causing an on-board explosion.

„07013“ (SCR,
9/93, AFM, 6/01)


??.??.??  

?

 

„five
crashed within one year“


22.06.95  

?

Both crew
ejected safely.

Crashed
at Baler, Aurora, after running out of fuel while becoming lost during
gunnery training.

Sixth
loss, eight aircraft not airworthy, 10 air-worthy.


04.07.95  

09006

Both crew
ejected safely.

Crashed
(also at Baler, Aurora?) during Exercise SANAY-SIBAT 95 while en route from
Basa AB to Wallace AS, San Fernando, La Union. Aircraft is now described as
„damaged“ and has been noted

active
again.


14.12.98  

07009

Both crew
suffered only minor injuries.

Written
off in emergency landing at Mabiga, Pampanga, following engine failure
during routine flight training.

After
this accident the government cancelled all plans to acquire further S.211s.


14.01.02  

07017


Instructor Cpt. Leo Maurice Ramos and student Lt. Arby Bryan de Guzman were
killed (as were at least three civilians on the ground).

Crashed
into houses inside the National Food Authority compound in Brgy. M.S.Garcia,
Cabanatuan City, Nueva Ecija, due to mechanical problems after making
several low passes over Cabanatuan during a „contact proficiency“ flight
from Basa AB. It was reported that the pilot had been giving „salutes“ to
friends on the ground.

Only
five S.211s remained in airworthy condition following this accident.