Philippine Navy/Marines Individual Weapons
Date Updated: Sunday April 17, 2005


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NOTE:  THIS IS A REPRINT OF AN ADVERTISEMENT POSTED BY THE PAF.
PHILIPPINE AIR FORCE
Headquarters 420th Supply Wing
Clark Air Base, Angeles City, Pampanga
SALE THROUGH PUBLIC NEGOTIATION
The PAF Disposal Committee is accepting tender for the sale of the following disposable properties on “As Is — Where Is” basis through negotiation.
Eight (8) F-8H aircraft
Eighteen (18) T-28 engines
Two (2) lots of assorted aircraft parts
For details and schedule of inspection: call Cpt. Nick Ventura PAF at (045) 599-2014/2015 loc. 6524 or cell 0919-673-4092.
(Sgd.) BRIG GEN CLAUDIO P. ESTALILLA AFP
Chairman, PAF Disposal committee -
PDI — March 12,13 & 14,2003)
These are the remains of the once proud fleet of PAF F-8H Crusaders.  At it's high point, the PAF owned 25 Crusaders 
in addition to another 10 non-flyable airframes used as spares sources to keep the fleet flying.  PAF Crusaders
ranged over the Spartly Islands, participated in Cope Thunder exercises with the USAF and even intercepted Russian
Bear bombers flying from bases in the Kamchatka penninsula to Vietnam.  Nothing has replaced them. 
PAF F-8H 316, tail number 48629.  The 20mm Colt cannon are still in the gun bays for all the remaining aircraft.
Their ejection seats were removed and used in other PAF F-8s.  You can see the IRST dome in front of the nose.  PAF F-8s also had air intercept
radar, radar warning receivers (mounted on top the tail) as well as guidance systems for Bullpup radio command guided ASMs.  They also came equipped
5 inch Zuni rockets as well as triple ejector racks which enabled it to carry a fairly large bomb load.
Note that even the revetments are overgrown....
The picture above shows the variable incidence wing of the F-8 Crusader to good effect.  307 actually looks pretty complete
including having its ejection seat still inside the cockpit.  Maybe this was one of the last flyable aircraft.  
It was used in the filming of the movie about the Cuban Missile Crisis and used to impersonate USN RF-8As, hence
the eyes painted on the wing and the motto "Eyes of the fleet".  
All F-8s had inflight refuelling capability housed in the hump visible here (to the rear of the cockpit, mid fuselage).
Makes me wonder whether the PAF actually trained in aerial refueling while they operated F-8s.  Anyone know?
 
The sad remains of a one proud fleet and a once proud force....
The current state of the PAF....
With thanks to Eric Alvia for the information and the pictures.